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Posts from the ‘Articles’ Category

Article in PPMG: Reviving the classical approach to PA

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 5.17.31 PMMy article “The Aims of Public Administration: Reviving the Classical View” has just been published in Perspectives on Public Management and Governance.  Free access here.

Paper forthcoming in PPMG

My paper “The aims of public administration: Reviving the classical view” has been accepted for publication in Perspectives on Public Management and Governance.  The working version of the paper is available here.  More about PPMG here.

Article on fiscal rules and austerity now published

29280 Ind Global 22-2 Cover.inddMy article, “No Simple Fix: Fiscal Rules and the Politics of Austerity,” has now been published by the Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies.

“Nation-state” article on Foreign Policy Association must-read list

FPBLOGO_200-100x100My article for the Wilson Quarterly, The Nation-State: Not Dead Yet, is on the Foreign Policy Association’s must-read list for August 7-14.

New paper: why the nation-state is not dead yet

I’ve just posted a short paper on SSRN, “The Nation-State: Not Dead Yet.”  It marks twenty years since the publication of several influential books (by Kenichi Ohmae, Jean-Marie Guéhenno, and Susan Strange) that predicted the end of the nation-state.

Wilson Quarterly revamps article on WikiLeaks

Screen Shot 2014-08-08 at 10.18.09 AMWilson Quarterly has done a very nice redesign of my 2011 article, “The WikiLeaks Illusion.”  Read the article.

What’s missing in public administration? The big picture

Screen Shot 2013-12-23 at 2.55.35 PMThe following comment was published in the print edition of ASPA’s PA Times in May 2015.  Download the PDF.

It is a sad truth that the field of American public administration does not enjoy the respect among the public that it did two generations ago. This is partly a self-inflicted wound. Scholars in public administration have made choices that have undercut the public’s interest in the work they do. Read more

Why Occupy lost its steam

2014+17_islam_smallThe following comment was published in the May 2-8 2014 issue of The New Statesman, as part of a supplement produced by the Webb Memorial Trust.  Download as PDF.

It’s been three years since the magazine Adbusters sent out the tweet that triggered the Occupy movement: “On Sept. 17, flood into lower Manhattan, set up tents, kitchens, peaceful barricades and occupy Wall Street.” By late 2011, many Occupiers were convinced that the new movement would change the world. Some called it “one of the most significant and hopeful events of our lifetimes.” Today, however, optimism about the Occupy movement has faded away. Why did it lose steam so quickly? Read more

WikiLeaks article has most-read status for two years

Screen Shot 2014-03-30 at 9.53.59 AMWikiLeaks: The Illusion of Transparency, originally published in March 2012, has now completed two years on the “most-read articles” list for International Review of Administrative SciencesRead the article.

Reorganization study published, twenty years later

CampbellIn 1993, Prime Minister Kim Campbell (right) launched a reorganization exercise that was promoted as “the most significant downsizing and restructuring of government ever undertaken in Canada.”  A federal agency, the Canadian Centre for Management Development, contracted with ten academics to conduct a study of the restructuring.  (I wrote the report that examined the merger of two departments, Public Works and Supply and Services.)  The overall study was completed, prepared for publication — and then shelved.  Nine of the studies have now been posted online by the University of Victoria.  (The tenth study is still unavailable: “There was difficulty in securing the necessary approvals for its release under the current publication guidelines of the Government of Canada.”)  Several of the authors will meet to discuss the project in Ottawa on March 12.  The author of the lead chapter, Peter Aucoin of Dalhousie University, passed away in 2011.  The Canadian Centre for Management Development is now the Canadian School for Public Service.